четверг, 7 сентября 2017 г.

ENYO helps your body give the cold shoulder to viruses

Meet the SME Instrment InnovatorsDid you know that in order to spread, viruses need to use the metabolism of their host? Viruses exploit the human cellular machinery by interacting with the host's intracellular proteins, which enables them to replicate and spread an infection. Whereas most current antivirals target the virus itself, SME Instrument-funded MIMESIS aims to block the interactions between the virus and the host, thus cutting the replication process and preventing the virus from infecting the body. 

This strategy is not only efficient but it gives breathing space to the 
fight against microbiological resistance. By tackling the problem at the 
source and preventing viruses from interacting with the body, the process 
has the potential to combat the emergence of resistant strains and diversify 
the range of therapeutic tools to cure them.
ENYO Pharma, the company behind MIMESIS has developed a list of 10.000 
therapeutic molecules that can modulate the biology of the host cell and are
 capable of altering the interactions between the proteins of viruses and host cells.
This library of developable chemical templates will be available for screening 
in phenotypic assays for inhibitors of the replication cycle of several viruses.
 For the moment the viruses under their radar are Influenza, respiratory syncytial 
virus, responsible for most respiratory infections in young children, rhinovirus 
responsible for colds and Zika. This approach will later be extended to other 
infectious diseases and cancer.
In 2016 the company received an SME Instrument Phase 2 grant to accelerate 
and scale-up the development of their project. Dr Eric Meldrum, ENYO Pharma's 
Chief Scientific Officer commented, "We are very honoured to receive the recognition 
from Horizon 2020 in what was a highly competitive process. MIMESIS represents a 
real paradigm shift in the development of new innovative drugs for pathologies where 
the medical need is immense. This financing will enable us to screen our library of 
original peptides and small molecules on hundreds of intracellular human targets 
previously untapped by the pharmaceutical industry.”